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The Magic Order, Vol. 1

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We live in a world where we've never seen a monster, and The Magic Order is the reason we sleep safely in our beds. Magic meets the Mob in The Magic Order, as five families of magicians -- sworn to protect our world for generations -- must battle an enemy who's picking them off one by one. By day, they live among us as our neighbors, friends and co-workers, but by night th We live in a world where we've never seen a monster, and The Magic Order is the reason we sleep safely in our beds. Magic meets the Mob in The Magic Order, as five families of magicians -- sworn to protect our world for generations -- must battle an enemy who's picking them off one by one. By day, they live among us as our neighbors, friends and co-workers, but by night they are the sorcerers, magicians and wizards that protect us from the forces of darkness...unless the darkness gets them first. Collects THE MAGIC ORDER #1-6.


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We live in a world where we've never seen a monster, and The Magic Order is the reason we sleep safely in our beds. Magic meets the Mob in The Magic Order, as five families of magicians -- sworn to protect our world for generations -- must battle an enemy who's picking them off one by one. By day, they live among us as our neighbors, friends and co-workers, but by night th We live in a world where we've never seen a monster, and The Magic Order is the reason we sleep safely in our beds. Magic meets the Mob in The Magic Order, as five families of magicians -- sworn to protect our world for generations -- must battle an enemy who's picking them off one by one. By day, they live among us as our neighbors, friends and co-workers, but by night they are the sorcerers, magicians and wizards that protect us from the forces of darkness...unless the darkness gets them first. Collects THE MAGIC ORDER #1-6.

30 review for The Magic Order, Vol. 1

  1. 4 out of 5

    Anne

    3.5 stars It's not perfect, but I would definitely love to read more. The gist is that The Order is a group of magic users who protect the earth from supernatural threats, and there is a that a severely dysfunctional family of magicians goes to war with mystic bad guys. The entire time I'm reading this I was thinking that it was a pretty straightforward story about villains who are evil for the sake of being evil and then trying to sort of family drama in a magical setting. But. That last issue has 3.5 stars It's not perfect, but I would definitely love to read more. The gist is that The Order is a group of magic users who protect the earth from supernatural threats, and there is a that a severely dysfunctional family of magicians goes to war with mystic bad guys. The entire time I'm reading this I was thinking that it was a pretty straightforward story about villains who are evil for the sake of being evil and then trying to sort of family drama in a magical setting. But. That last issue has some twists that I didn't see coming. If you like supernatural comics, you could do worse than this one.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Sean Gibson

    Take five families of magicians, stir in some bloody internecine conflict, add a dash of mysterious monsters, toss in several fistfuls of graphic violence, and throw in a pinch of completely unnecessary nudity and you’ve got The Magic Order. Netflix’s first comic release (and soon to be streaming on a TV near you) is pretty typical Millar, which is intended as both a compliment and a caution. If you’ve dipped your toes into Millar’s creator-owned waters before, well, first and foremost, get a to Take five families of magicians, stir in some bloody internecine conflict, add a dash of mysterious monsters, toss in several fistfuls of graphic violence, and throw in a pinch of completely unnecessary nudity and you’ve got The Magic Order. Netflix’s first comic release (and soon to be streaming on a TV near you) is pretty typical Millar, which is intended as both a compliment and a caution. If you’ve dipped your toes into Millar’s creator-owned waters before, well, first and foremost, get a towel, and don’t do that again, because it’s both rude and kind of gross to go sticking your feet in someone’s personal supply of fluids. Once you’ve done that, know that if you’ve previously enjoyed engaging in that verboten activity with Mr. Millar, you’ll probably like this and, if you haven’t, then you probably won’t. If you’re new to moistening yourself with Millar’s liquescent subtances, you’ll dig this if you like magic, secret societies, and plot twists, so definitely check it out. My only complaint: so much time is spent on the internal warfare that, though it’s alluded to briefly, we don’t really get to see the Order in action doing what it normally does very much, which in and of itself would be interesting. More to come in future volumes, perhaps.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Sam Quixote

    The Magic Order secretly battles threats to humanity and keeps the peace - until now. A renegade group of magicians led by the evil Madame Albany is challenging the current Order, headed up by the patriarch of the Moonstone family, for power, and removing anyone in their way via the mysterious and deadly assassin, The Venetian. But do the Moonstones have a trick up their sleeve to prevail against this seemingly unstoppable onslaught…? This is Mark Millar’s best comic since the first Jupiter’s Le The Magic Order secretly battles threats to humanity and keeps the peace - until now. A renegade group of magicians led by the evil Madame Albany is challenging the current Order, headed up by the patriarch of the Moonstone family, for power, and removing anyone in their way via the mysterious and deadly assassin, The Venetian. But do the Moonstones have a trick up their sleeve to prevail against this seemingly unstoppable onslaught…? This is Mark Millar’s best comic since the first Jupiter’s Legacy, which isn’t to say that either are that good but are surprisingly less terrible than Millar’s usual standard! And like Jupiter’s Legacy, this is a story of an extraordinary, albeit dysfunctional, family. Cordelia Moonstone is a carbon copy of Chloe Sampson and the flashback to the family battling Lovecraftian monsters was just like the flashbacks in Legacy. On the subject of derivative, Moonstone Castle and Uncle Edgar are basically The Dreaming and Lucien the Librarian from Neil Gaiman’s Sandman, and The Venetian strongly reminded me of Guy Davis’ The Marquis. The story is very simplistic: hero magicians vs villain magicians, ditto Madame Albany’s motivations and appearance - she’s the baddie so she wears a gimp mask and doesn’t have pupils! Still, the ways the magicians are assassinated by the Venetian were really imaginative and compelling - definitely the best part of the book. And, while it is simplistic, I wouldn’t say the story was that dull or predictable, beyond the obvious question of whether good will triumph over evil. That ending though: oof, what a cop-out! And the reveal of the Venetian and their motivations will only be palatable to those who thought Anakin’s reasoning for turning to the Dark Side in Revenge of the Sith was satisfying! Olivier Coipel’s art was outstanding. He really sells the unusual deaths of the magicians perfectly, showing the reader some truly remarkable things (I’m thinking in particular of the death at the end of the first issue). The Venetian is a strikingly menacing figure too, and the book’s visuals as a whole benefit enormously from multi-award-winning colourist Dave Stewart’s usual incredible work. The Magic Order has its flaws though not as many as you might expect from latter-day Mark Millar. It’s a great-looking comic that holds the attention and even occasionally entertains - not too shabby!

  4. 4 out of 5

    Chad

    This is Millar's best idea he's had in years, perfectly executed by Olivier Coipel and Dave Stewart. Yes, it's a simple concept. Evil magicians start murdering good ones in order to obtain an all-powerful book. Millar leaves a ton of meat on the bone focusing on the basic story instead of character. But it's so well done though, that I want to see more. Coipel's art is so well crafted. There's a reason why he's one of the top artists working in comics. The end of the first issue is just chilling This is Millar's best idea he's had in years, perfectly executed by Olivier Coipel and Dave Stewart. Yes, it's a simple concept. Evil magicians start murdering good ones in order to obtain an all-powerful book. Millar leaves a ton of meat on the bone focusing on the basic story instead of character. But it's so well done though, that I want to see more. Coipel's art is so well crafted. There's a reason why he's one of the top artists working in comics. The end of the first issue is just chilling. This appears to be the first comic under Millar's Netflix deal. As with a lot of his latter day comics, this is almost a story treatment more than it is a fully fledged story. There's a lot Millar leaves hanging and not fleshed out that Coipel's detailed and fully realized visuals fill in to make this better than it should be. Received a review copy from Image and Edelweiss. All thoughts are my own and in no way influenced by the aforementioned.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Kyle

    Actual rating: 4.5 Damn, this was good! Such a simple concept, but executed so very well by Mark Millar and his team. I haven’t read any of Millar’s previous work, but I’m familiar enough with it to know that this is pretty exceptional! An order of (good) magicians tasked with keeping the world safe, being hunted down by a mysterious assassin and a band of renegade (evil) magicians. There ya go. For such a short series, it packed just the right amount of characterization for me to really enjoy each Actual rating: 4.5 Damn, this was good! Such a simple concept, but executed so very well by Mark Millar and his team. I haven’t read any of Millar’s previous work, but I’m familiar enough with it to know that this is pretty exceptional! An order of (good) magicians tasked with keeping the world safe, being hunted down by a mysterious assassin and a band of renegade (evil) magicians. There ya go. For such a short series, it packed just the right amount of characterization for me to really enjoy each one without being overdone or half-baked. The story is easy to follow, and the art style is the sort I gravitate towards. Olivier Coipel’s artistry isn’t over-stylized (which I love, because that can often ruin a comic— make it too chaotic or cartoony), but fantastical enough for me to truly appreciate the images he created. The characters are super expressive; Coipel captures emotions beautifully. I dig how Adult it is, too: the violence, the horror, the vulgarity... this ain’t your kid’s comic book! Each panel I pored over, finding the details that are so often lacking or lost in other lesser works. All that mixed seamlessly with the fantastic coloring by Dave Stewart (un-muddied, clear, and vibrant). Some of the ideas and magic present throughout the story was so creative and unique (trapping someone inside a classic novel’s plot!!!). I don’t know, I just think this whole comic was so cool! My only complaint would be that I felt the ending was rushed— too many loose ends. I really wanted more after Issue #6 ended.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Monsour

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. This is my first Mark Millar book and BOY its pretty "Eh" The art and color is amazing and the first half issues are pretty intense but the last issue just flip all my expectation to this book. It's pretty lame that the way the author end it by reversing every death. That completely voids all of the consequences from the previous issues. Are they making more of this or is it just a mini series and that's why they end it this way? Fun read

  7. 5 out of 5

    Štěpán Tichý

    What was this? Oh, I'm so sad that I think about stories and that I love storytelling, otherwise, I'd enjoy this. This was bad. The story is unfortunately bad. One thing that is excellent is Olivier Coipel. It is magnificent and great. I want Olivier to draw everything. him and Clay Mann! Art? 5* Story? 2* I'd love to give this lower rating. But I can't. Because of the art. Back to this. Soft magic systems work. BUT. "A wizard did it" doesn't work when everyone is a wizard and there is no rules, not What was this? Oh, I'm so sad that I think about stories and that I love storytelling, otherwise, I'd enjoy this. This was bad. The story is unfortunately bad. One thing that is excellent is Olivier Coipel. It is magnificent and great. I want Olivier to draw everything. him and Clay Mann! Art? 5* Story? 2* I'd love to give this lower rating. But I can't. Because of the art. Back to this. Soft magic systems work. BUT. "A wizard did it" doesn't work when everyone is a wizard and there is no rules, nothing. Something happens because of plot and shock value. It sucks. There is a "twist" which is really poorly made. And it is really sad because Harry Potter (which was an obvious inspiration here) made this much, much better. Clues, variabilities, little bread crumbs... Millar is not writing like his heart is in. The concept is cool. But it is exactly what it will be - a pitch for Netflix to make a better story with it. One last spoiler thing: YOU STUPID FUCK, IF YOU KNOW HOW TO RESURRECT THE DEAD AND YOU DO IT WITH JUST A WAVE OF A WAND WHY DIDNT YOU RESURRECT YOUR NIECE?

  8. 4 out of 5

    Shannon

    This was just ok honestly, the earlier issues are better and it just kind of fizzles. Individual issue reviews: #1 | #2 | #3 | #4 | #5 | #6 Total review score: 2.58

  9. 4 out of 5

    Jakub Kvíz

    A fun, action-packed story about the order of wizards living in our world and protecting us from evil and darkness. But it's mostly about members of The Magic Order being killed one by one. It's similar to Millar's Reborn where the reader is thrown into a complex world with little explaining but The Magic Order is a really easy-to-read story with perfect art and huge plot hole at the end. I wonder if this is just a "preview" for possible Netflix TV show or if Millar plans to do more.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Alan

    By the time I got to the end of the book I came away with the feeling that this reminded me of Millar's Jupiter books (Circle and Legacy). This is a very story driven tale, and not a lot of characterization takes place. That doesn't make it a bad book, but the characters felt interchangeable to me in many ways. Yes, they have different names, look different, but... At the end it didn't feel like any of them stood out. The premise is good. A family essentially controls magic in the world. What is By the time I got to the end of the book I came away with the feeling that this reminded me of Millar's Jupiter books (Circle and Legacy). This is a very story driven tale, and not a lot of characterization takes place. That doesn't make it a bad book, but the characters felt interchangeable to me in many ways. Yes, they have different names, look different, but... At the end it didn't feel like any of them stood out. The premise is good. A family essentially controls magic in the world. What is allowed out, is well not a lot unless you're one of the order. Basic concept, executed well. The Jupiter books picked up for me in series two, where I felt the individual characters stood out more. As this felt likes it is leading into a volume 2, I'm expecting more of the same from Millar.

  11. 4 out of 5

    David

    Giving it five stars cause the art is AMAZING and that's mainly what I look for in a comic. The plot on the other hand is very simple, like very on the surface, I liked the characters but the story could've been developed better.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Michael J.

    Mark Millar is a skilled storyteller who manages to take familiar themes and make them fresh. Olivier Copiel is a talented illustrator whose ability to convey various emotions through facial expressions and body language is brilliant, as well as his high-powered action scenes. A secret order (several generations of select families) have protected Earth forever from various threats through the utilization of magical abilities and spells. The best defense and a lifelong mission is to keep a dang Mark Millar is a skilled storyteller who manages to take familiar themes and make them fresh. Olivier Copiel is a talented illustrator whose ability to convey various emotions through facial expressions and body language is brilliant, as well as his high-powered action scenes. A secret order (several generations of select families) have protected Earth forever from various threats through the utilization of magical abilities and spells. The best defense and a lifelong mission is to keep a dangerous spell book from getting into the wrong hands and causing the end of the world. This is the story of the internal battle between several family members for possession of the book. You may be reminded of the conflicts in Game of Thrones and The Godfather, but Millar reveals in a text piece that his inspiration was Shakespeare's King Lear. In fact, several of the characters are named for characters in the play, as well as places, etc. It's a big cast but several players make a favorable impression and become favorites. Initially for me, it was Gabriel (who Copiel draws to resemble actor Liev Schreiber), a family member who's left the group after a daughter discovers his magical wand and ends up dead (like a child getting into daddy's gun cabinet). He's comes back into play to assist the others with a vengeance and is a bad-ass character. However, my preference for him faded as the story took some twists and turns. I'd have to say Cordelia (the escapist) is the best of the bunch. However, they're all fascinating and this is a fast-paced read best appreciated in a collection like this. (I read the original monthly issues). Recommended.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Bárbara

    Nice story but very underwhelming. The art is incredible though.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Rory Wilding

    Ever since the publication of the first Harry Potter book in 1997, the successful franchise has spanned across numerous mediums and has remained an ongoing influence for other creators, paving the way for a swath of young adult fiction in sci-fi and fantasy. In fact, JK Rowling’s Wizarding World is so evident in today’s culture that its influence even shines on Mark Millar’s latest Image comic The Magic Order. Please click here for my full review.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Munawar Mobin

    This novel perfectly sums up both of creators' oeuvre - Mark Millar's meh story telling with amazing universe building with Oliver Copiel's brilliant artwork, consistently great The story told through these tiny 6 issues was nothing new, nothing refreshing and nothing revolutionary. It was a pretty heard of story with a lightly packed twist in the end. However, I'd be at a loss if i didn't mention how good the universe itself is. The magic in this world out lives things done with any other storie This novel perfectly sums up both of creators' oeuvre - Mark Millar's meh story telling with amazing universe building with Oliver Copiel's brilliant artwork, consistently great The story told through these tiny 6 issues was nothing new, nothing refreshing and nothing revolutionary. It was a pretty heard of story with a lightly packed twist in the end. However, I'd be at a loss if i didn't mention how good the universe itself is. The magic in this world out lives things done with any other stories concerning magic, perhaps even coming close to the genius of sandman and doom patrol. I'm talking spells that change the essence of time, dark magic that can obviously bring back people from the dead and of course, a spell to transport your enemies into your favorite novel as its main character- everything is otherworldly and insane and deserved so much more than six issues. Really hoping someone else picks this up or writes more stories Oliver Copiel's action scenes are amazing - subtle reminders of his superb thor run

  16. 4 out of 5

    Lukáš Pokorný

    Art is great and there are some cool ideas. That's all. That's all positives I can say about this series. This is one of the most shallow, lazy and cheap stories I have ever read. No foreshadowing, no hinting, no coherence of the magic world. Just continual sequence of making shits up and lazy (magic) solutions for the plot. To be specific let me explain. Consider Harry Potter (obvious story to compare). In each book author explains some new principles and characters and foreshadows to the reade Art is great and there are some cool ideas. That's all. That's all positives I can say about this series. This is one of the most shallow, lazy and cheap stories I have ever read. No foreshadowing, no hinting, no coherence of the magic world. Just continual sequence of making shits up and lazy (magic) solutions for the plot. To be specific let me explain. Consider Harry Potter (obvious story to compare). In each book author explains some new principles and characters and foreshadows to the reader events that will follow. So every reader can deduce outcome of the book. They usually don't, but after reading they go back and say "how could I never see this coming, it's so obvious". Events and outcomes of the books are logic because reader have all tools to solve it. It's simply called playing fair game with the reader. And here comes Mark Millar with his lazy story. There is biggest twist of the book and you are like "What? Why? Did I miss something? Why is this happening? There was no hint for this." It's like if you were telling the story of Red Riding Hood and when the wolf eats grandma the Red Riding Hood suddenly draws lightsaber and cuts wolf's head off. Because she was a jedi the whole time, gotcha! SPOILER: Story of The Magic Order climaxed because one character knows spell that solves basicaly whole plot. How fucking convinient. END SPOILER

  17. 4 out of 5

    Ruthsic

    Warnings: body horror, physical violence, child death, full-frontal nudity Rep: Queer character and POC characters The Magic Order has magicians acting as guardians for regular humans, working from the shadows to help with magical cases while also living among the people as regular folk. This story revolves around the Moonstones, one of the five families tasked with this guardian role, as well as protecting an ancient book of dangerous spells. As members of the Inner Circle of the Order start gett Warnings: body horror, physical violence, child death, full-frontal nudity Rep: Queer character and POC characters The Magic Order has magicians acting as guardians for regular humans, working from the shadows to help with magical cases while also living among the people as regular folk. This story revolves around the Moonstones, one of the five families tasked with this guardian role, as well as protecting an ancient book of dangerous spells. As members of the Inner Circle of the Order start getting assassinated one by one, the Moonstones try to figure out how to defeat their challenger, an assassin working for their enemy, Albany (who incidentally, broke off from their family). The best thing about the book is the artwork. Like, the story alone would have gotten 3 stars from me, but the artwork is what pushed it forward. The linework is detailed and the coloring is subtle but semi-realistic, and the storyboard is brilliant. There is a scene, during the first assassination, that absolutely sends chills down your spine. It does feel like, at times, it revels in its gratuitous violence. As for the story, well - firstly it doesn't set up much in case of world-building; you pretty much fill blanks as you are being introduced to each Moonstone. The story is engaging enough, but the villain feels one-dimensional. And then there is the fact that the ending is pretty much a deus ex machina sort of convenience that resolves two twists that come one after another without any set-up (why couldn't have you just used that ages ago, Cordelia, huh?), wrapping it up in a complete story arc (thankfully). Overall, it is entertaining but the artwork is probably the only reason I'll pick up a sequel. Received an advance reader copy in exchange for a fair review from Image Comics, via Edelweiss.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Jonathon Rodzik

    This was a great comic series and story. The story and art were fabulous. Can’t wait for the Netflix series and book 2!

  19. 4 out of 5

    Venus Maneater

    I never expected this to be so wonderful, to resonate so perfectly with me. The art is amazing, every page is a work of art and there are some spreads I just had to stare at for a while. Everyone is just so beautiful, even when they're meant to be ugly. The story is just what I wanted. Wizards in the modern world, hidden from view. It feels a little like something China Mieville would write, maybe? The humor is wonderful. The obese, pony-tailed neckbeard as the keeper of artifacts had me in stitc I never expected this to be so wonderful, to resonate so perfectly with me. The art is amazing, every page is a work of art and there are some spreads I just had to stare at for a while. Everyone is just so beautiful, even when they're meant to be ugly. The story is just what I wanted. Wizards in the modern world, hidden from view. It feels a little like something China Mieville would write, maybe? The humor is wonderful. The obese, pony-tailed neckbeard as the keeper of artifacts had me in stitches. All too recognizable. And the horror...imagine the scariest book you've read. Imagine the most boring books, the most dangerous books. Imagine someone magicking you in there, playing with time and space. For them a second but for you, trapped in there, ages. Months, weeks, years. This story has been told before, yes, but seldom as well as now. The ending is sugary sweet and it's exactly what you need.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Shannon Appelcline

    Mark Millar seems to be writing entirely in the hope of creating TV series nowadays, and if we weren't sure of it, this Netflix-branded comic seems to prove the point. Basically: Magic Order protects the world. But we get six issues of them fighting with another Magic Order and killing each other in increasingly cruel and otherworldly ways. It's like Harry Potter meets the '70s Spectre. There are great characters here, and there are some big twists clearly intended to be surprise episode ends (som Mark Millar seems to be writing entirely in the hope of creating TV series nowadays, and if we weren't sure of it, this Netflix-branded comic seems to prove the point. Basically: Magic Order protects the world. But we get six issues of them fighting with another Magic Order and killing each other in increasingly cruel and otherworldly ways. It's like Harry Potter meets the '70s Spectre. There are great characters here, and there are some big twists clearly intended to be surprise episode ends (some of those twists earned, but some of them very much not so). And it's all perfectly OK. I'd be happy to read additional volumes, but as with most of Millar's recent comics, this one is too focused on TV razzle-dazzle to have much depth.

  21. 5 out of 5

    J.Z.

    Wow! Mark Millar is by far the most amazing and influential writer to me, despite the fact that I write novels and he writes comic books. I often find books / movies predictable, even the ones with a twist, but Millar had me guessing through this entire story. Millar's greatest talent is creating characters that are relatable and feel *real*. I was sympathetic to each of them, and despite having just a short time with a few of them, none of them felt like cardboard cut outs. I absolutely live thi Wow! Mark Millar is by far the most amazing and influential writer to me, despite the fact that I write novels and he writes comic books. I often find books / movies predictable, even the ones with a twist, but Millar had me guessing through this entire story. Millar's greatest talent is creating characters that are relatable and feel *real*. I was sympathetic to each of them, and despite having just a short time with a few of them, none of them felt like cardboard cut outs. I absolutely live this story and this author, I recommend it to anyone even if you're not a comic reader!

  22. 5 out of 5

    Bill

    Excellent first book, I do hope there will be more!

  23. 5 out of 5

    Abu Syed sajib

    Fantastic read!Although the ending seemed a bit forced but it was highly enjoyable...

  24. 5 out of 5

    Jason

    Harry Potter meets the Sopranos with Game of Thrones twists!

  25. 5 out of 5

    Elaine

    3.5 stars I picked up The Magic Order, Vol. 1 because a few days ago I read that Netflix is turning it into a series. And what's not to love? Magic, family drama, bickering siblings, gore, blood, and naturally, good v. evil! I'm so there! This wasn't bad, it was good but it could have been better with the world building though I know that's hard to do with only 176 pages for a graphic novel. The Magic Order is about five families of magicians tasked with protecting humans from magic and mayhem. Wh 3.5 stars I picked up The Magic Order, Vol. 1 because a few days ago I read that Netflix is turning it into a series. And what's not to love? Magic, family drama, bickering siblings, gore, blood, and naturally, good v. evil! I'm so there! This wasn't bad, it was good but it could have been better with the world building though I know that's hard to do with only 176 pages for a graphic novel. The Magic Order is about five families of magicians tasked with protecting humans from magic and mayhem. When a diabolical witch begins eliminating senior magicians and those who stand in her way, its up to the family named Moonstone to save the world. It's dark, fun, and at times more about family than about magic, with the focus on the three very different Moonstone siblings. There's a good twist at the end, which I didn't see coming, and I usually do! I'm really looking forward to reading more about this world, how the characters will develop further and what other devious shenanigans the bad guys get into. I've been looking for a new series to follow and this might be it.

  26. 4 out of 5

    Alexander Peterhans

    Read as 6 seperate issues Starts pretty interesting, but then suffers from inconsistent storytelling and cliched dialogue. The ending was a bit of a letdown, specifically (view spoiler)[the mechanics of the resurrection spell - as I understand it, you need to basically swap places, a blood relative is sacrificed for a blood relative to be resurrected.. so how did Cordelia manage to resurrect all those killed by Lady Albany and Gabriel? (hide spoiler)] The art is pretty stellar.

  27. 4 out of 5

    Roy

    An adult version of harry potter in a way. Probably the best thing Ive read by millar for sometime. Its pretty gruesome at stages. Still its crazy to think how much influence Harry Potter has on the wizard market story.

  28. 4 out of 5

    Brian Poole

    The Magic Order unites A-List creators Mark Millar and Olivier Coipel in the first series from the Image/Netflix collaboration. The Order is a secret organization with long roots; protecting average people from mystical threats, its members hide in plain sight. The Moonstone family is prominent in the group. Leonard, a well-known stage magician, is the current leader, a flawed father to his adult children. Daughter Cordelia is the black sheep, a rebellious escapologist whose decisions constantly The Magic Order unites A-List creators Mark Millar and Olivier Coipel in the first series from the Image/Netflix collaboration. The Order is a secret organization with long roots; protecting average people from mystical threats, its members hide in plain sight. The Moonstone family is prominent in the group. Leonard, a well-known stage magician, is the current leader, a flawed father to his adult children. Daughter Cordelia is the black sheep, a rebellious escapologist whose decisions constantly exasperate her father. Loyal middle son Regan has a fiery temper, but is devoted to his family and its cause. Eldest son Gabriel, possibly the family’s most powerful member, has fled the world of magic in the wake of an unbearable tragedy. A renegade from the Order begins killing its members, using a mysterious assassin, in the pursuit of the most powerful, and most dangerous, book of magic in existence. If the Moonstones can’t unite as a family, the world might be overwhelmed by dark magic. Millar appears to have a great deal of fun with this series, mixing Shakespearean-inspired family drama with outlandish magical conceits. The Moonstone family are a strong anchor for The Magic Order, providing a vehicle for building out this fictional world while also providing a compelling focal point for the character drama. That Millar handles the interpersonal drama deftly is no surprise, and the complicated, contrary Cordelia emerges as the crucial part of the mix. Millar comes up with some inventive concepts for this world (the location of the Order’s headquarters, a special hotel for magicians) and mixes in solid action concepts and a few well-crafted twists that should more than hold a reader’s interest throughout. Coipel, a long-time Marvel exclusive, thrives when given the chance to stretch his wings. His trademark style is evident and he tackles the big ideas of the story with flair and imagination. Working with ace colorist Dave Stewart, he crafts a suitably shadow-edged environment for these darker characters, presenting the quiet character moments with as much dynamism as the big ticket action sequences. He contributes some first rate design work and whips up imagery that the Netflix adaptation would be wise to just borrow wholesale. Coipel takes a more classicist approach to page construction, eschewing the trend of overly complex panel design when a more traditional approach serves the storytelling quite well. Stewart’s intuitive sense for the tones that enhance the pages is on full display, giving the whole proceedings a shimmer and glow that’s inviting and attractive, with carefully placed color effects that add interest and dramatic urgency. It’s beautiful, expressive work from the art team, one of the better looking books in recent memory. This is rated Mature for a reason. There’s some adult content, as well as imagery that might shock some sensibilities; the sequence that opens the series is especially shocking. For all that, nothing here feels gratuitous; the creators are making a book for an adult audience and don’t water down the material, but never feel like they go over the top, either. For fans of the creators or of smart, urban fantasy, The Magic Order is well worth reading.

  29. 4 out of 5

    Simon Chadwick

    The first thing that strikes you about this book is the sheer abundance of Netflix logos all across it. And with good reason. The digital behemoth has snapped up Mark Millar’s increasingly varied set of stories and set him loose on yet more, so although the comics fraternity has been aware of him for twenty years or more he’s very likely to become much more widely known over the coming years. Part of Millar’s success is his ability to take well-worn tropes from across comics, fantasy and science The first thing that strikes you about this book is the sheer abundance of Netflix logos all across it. And with good reason. The digital behemoth has snapped up Mark Millar’s increasingly varied set of stories and set him loose on yet more, so although the comics fraternity has been aware of him for twenty years or more he’s very likely to become much more widely known over the coming years. Part of Millar’s success is his ability to take well-worn tropes from across comics, fantasy and science fiction and invest them with new life. He’s the guy that modernised the Avengers in the Ultimates, which in turn became the basis for the MCU’s take on it all, so that should give you an idea to his approach. Which brings us to The Magic Order. There’s a little bit of Harry Potter about it, but not a lot. It owes more to those cosmic and supernatural threats that flourish throughout comics, where a group teams up to beat back something monstrous. By and large, that’s all backstory here, and part of Millar’s cleverness is to understand that you’ve read or seen similar takes on before. He’ll throw a few nods towards those aspects in a ‘you know what I’m talking about’ sort of way and then the reader fills in all the blanks themselves. No lengthy origin stories or heavy exposition needed, so instead you leap straight in with the more interesting stuff, and the inevitable twists Millar then puts on your expectations. Another thing he does quite well is family dynamics, whether they’re across several generations, or extended groups brought close by association or need, and that’s often where the good drama and anguish lies. And no different here. Somebody is picking off powerful magicians, all members of the Magic Order which consists of a group of specialist magic-types defending our reality. It doesn’t even appear to be too much of a mystery who is doing it, but like all magic tricks the question is how. The crowning glory of The Magic Order is Olivier Coipel’s artwork. You may have seen it on Thor or Spider-man (amongst much more) and he’s a great fit in bringing the real world and magic together (and not forgetting the ever stupendous colouring of Dave Stewart). Not one for younger readers, this contains mature themes and grisly deaths. Do you remember how everyone got excited when The Umbrella Academy debuted on Netflix? I suspect this will be a little like that. Read it first, and enjoy.

  30. 5 out of 5

    Nikita Angeles

    A dark, graphic, adult fantasy/horror comic. The Magic Order Vol. 1 though a little derivative, gives enough to hold and entertain you. A secret magic order that holds the monsters at bay from the world is threatened by a wronged villain. Madam Albany is out to take the magic order protected evil tome and turn the way of things on its head. Cue magic, graphic murders, monsters and an angsty family full of tropes. Set within beautifully dark art (that is kind of the biggest redeeming quality of th A dark, graphic, adult fantasy/horror comic. The Magic Order Vol. 1 though a little derivative, gives enough to hold and entertain you. A secret magic order that holds the monsters at bay from the world is threatened by a wronged villain. Madam Albany is out to take the magic order protected evil tome and turn the way of things on its head. Cue magic, graphic murders, monsters and an angsty family full of tropes. Set within beautifully dark art (that is kind of the biggest redeeming quality of the whole thing). I won’t go into the frustration of that consequence erasing ending because ugh, that really ruined the magic for me. But I loved the art, was interested in the world, the magic, artifacts, monsters, even some of the characters. Say what you want, I am always into the girls like Cordelia. Dark, self aware, powerful, slightly on the crazy side packed into a “fuck it” attitude. There was the making of something there that I could easily love. God, I just wish there was a little more detail put into it than what was given which was a little sparse and rushed, TBH. – 2/5 I would totally read more (if there’s more – I never know with these things) but that ending… I have received a copy of this book via Edelweiss in exchange for an honest review. Quick Review - https://nikitaangeleswrites.com/2019/...

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