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Super Sons: The Polarshield Project

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Jon Kent and Damian "Ian" Wayne are opposite in every way except one--they are the sons of the World's Greatest Heroes! To uncover a global conspiracy, this unlikely dynamic duo will need to learn to trust each other and work together to save the Earth. But who is the mysterious Candace, and what secrets does she hold that could be the key to everything? The polar ice caps Jon Kent and Damian "Ian" Wayne are opposite in every way except one--they are the sons of the World's Greatest Heroes! To uncover a global conspiracy, this unlikely dynamic duo will need to learn to trust each other and work together to save the Earth. But who is the mysterious Candace, and what secrets does she hold that could be the key to everything? The polar ice caps have nearly melted away, causing devastation to coastal cities. Erratic, deadly weather forces everyone inland, tearing families apart. Earth is facing its greatest crisis--and Superman and Batman are nowhere to be found. From New York Times best-selling author Ridley Pearson (Kingdom Keepers) and artist Ile Gonzalez comes the first book in an epic new series that follows the Super Sons of Superman and Batman as they struggle to find their place in a rapidly changing world!


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Jon Kent and Damian "Ian" Wayne are opposite in every way except one--they are the sons of the World's Greatest Heroes! To uncover a global conspiracy, this unlikely dynamic duo will need to learn to trust each other and work together to save the Earth. But who is the mysterious Candace, and what secrets does she hold that could be the key to everything? The polar ice caps Jon Kent and Damian "Ian" Wayne are opposite in every way except one--they are the sons of the World's Greatest Heroes! To uncover a global conspiracy, this unlikely dynamic duo will need to learn to trust each other and work together to save the Earth. But who is the mysterious Candace, and what secrets does she hold that could be the key to everything? The polar ice caps have nearly melted away, causing devastation to coastal cities. Erratic, deadly weather forces everyone inland, tearing families apart. Earth is facing its greatest crisis--and Superman and Batman are nowhere to be found. From New York Times best-selling author Ridley Pearson (Kingdom Keepers) and artist Ile Gonzalez comes the first book in an epic new series that follows the Super Sons of Superman and Batman as they struggle to find their place in a rapidly changing world!

30 review for Super Sons: The Polarshield Project

  1. 4 out of 5

    Chad

    DC's first foray into its new imprint for young children, DC Zoom, is unfortunately, a disappointment. I guess this is what happens when you have creators who know absolutely nothing about the characters write a comic book. The characterization is way off. Damian is an entitled rich kid who wants to be called Ian with none of his rich backstory, being the grandson of Ra's al Ghul. The story is incoherent at best. I can't believe Pearson has written like fifty children's books. I couldn't follow DC's first foray into its new imprint for young children, DC Zoom, is unfortunately, a disappointment. I guess this is what happens when you have creators who know absolutely nothing about the characters write a comic book. The characterization is way off. Damian is an entitled rich kid who wants to be called Ian with none of his rich backstory, being the grandson of Ra's al Ghul. The story is incoherent at best. I can't believe Pearson has written like fifty children's books. I couldn't follow his story at all. This is set in the future where climate change is flooding the coasts. For some reason, kids in the unaffected cities hate the refugees from other cities calling them Flood Runners. What are they supposed to do, stay and drown? Characters have stupid pun names like Dr. Para Sol and Dr. Cray Ving. Para and Cray aren't even names! This is also not a complete story, but only part 1 even though that is not indicated anywhere in the title or cover. The weak art is sloppy and unfinished looking, only somewhat saved by the coloring.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Sans

    Woooooooow. No. EDIT: I've been stewing over this for three days now and what's really bothering me are the characterizations. I get that this is part of the young'uns line DC is experimenting with. I get that it's not supposed to tie into the original Super Sons series in any way. But shouldn't it have at least the smallest of tethers to canon? As other reviewers have noted, the characterizations are wildly inaccurate, and honestly? It's insulting. Whitewashing Damian Ian and stripping him of an Woooooooow. No. EDIT: I've been stewing over this for three days now and what's really bothering me are the characterizations. I get that this is part of the young'uns line DC is experimenting with. I get that it's not supposed to tie into the original Super Sons series in any way. But shouldn't it have at least the smallest of tethers to canon? As other reviewers have noted, the characterizations are wildly inaccurate, and honestly? It's insulting. Whitewashing Damian Ian and stripping him of any and all growth his character has achieved is wholly unnecessary. Jon is weirdly tantrum-y and seems to manipulate the girls around him by using their attraction to him. I think we can all agree that is the absolute last thing Jon Kent would ever do. Honestly, I'm not sure what I expected. In the authors note at the front of this waste of paper, Pearson freely admits they don't read comic books and were in the dark about these characters when DC approached them to write this book. I'm guessing Pearson didn't do any research beyond a Google Image search before diving in. It's the only explanation for how wrong they got these boys.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Jen

    Artwork was serviceable, but ugly. On close-ups, characters had pig noses. Storyline was jumpy, multiple POV and timeline jumped when it went from POV to POV. Tons of dangling plot points to be dealt with in future issues. I won’t be seeking them out myself. Kind of boring, despite having too much going on. 2, could have/should have been better, stars.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Rod Brown

    In his foreword, Pearson admits he is new to the DC Universe...and it shows. His script is gibberish with a plot that jumps around randomly as if it were written by a kid rather than for kids. Or by an an adult who thinks comics are garbage lit and their readers deserve what they get. Special shout-out to his atrocious choice of names for cities (Wyndemere and Coleumbria) and characters (Para Sol, Cray Ving and Damian "Ian" Wayne a/k/a BatKid). Reviewed from an an Advance Reader's Copy that's bee In his foreword, Pearson admits he is new to the DC Universe...and it shows. His script is gibberish with a plot that jumps around randomly as if it were written by a kid rather than for kids. Or by an an adult who thinks comics are garbage lit and their readers deserve what they get. Special shout-out to his atrocious choice of names for cities (Wyndemere and Coleumbria) and characters (Para Sol, Cray Ving and Damian "Ian" Wayne a/k/a BatKid). Reviewed from an an Advance Reader's Copy that's been sitting around for a little while.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Teresa

    3.5 Thank you Netgalley, Ridley Pearson, and CD Entertainment for the opportunity to read this book in exchange for an honest review. I'm not a huge DC fan to begin with, but I generally like Batman as well as younger heroes (like the Teen Titans and Young Justice). So I was drawn to this by the fact that it features the sons of Batman and Superman, as well as introduces the reader to some new characters. This graphic novel has a lovey introduction by the author about the excitement that comes with 3.5 Thank you Netgalley, Ridley Pearson, and CD Entertainment for the opportunity to read this book in exchange for an honest review. I'm not a huge DC fan to begin with, but I generally like Batman as well as younger heroes (like the Teen Titans and Young Justice). So I was drawn to this by the fact that it features the sons of Batman and Superman, as well as introduces the reader to some new characters. This graphic novel has a lovey introduction by the author about the excitement that comes with a project like this, but also coming from a non DC background attempting to incorporate these new characters into the DC universe. The art is decent. I like the design for Jon Kent, but not so much for Damian "Ian" Wayne. The colors and character designs are simple, but in a good way. The reader is introduced to Candace, a supposed princess of some sort. How does she connect to our two super sons? Well, I guess you'll find out at the end, where there is some potential to this series. So what is the Polar Shield Project? In this world, global warming has been a major natural disaster. Over the course of time, coastal cities have built walls to keep the water at bay, but the walls break, or aren't high enough, so all the people must relocate. The Polar Shield project is a plan to cover the planets atmosphere with a layer of dust that will help regulate the Earth's temperature. Superman gets to handle this one because they are using Mars dust (or something like that. I didn't follow it 100%).. Meanwhile, Jon and Ian are complete opposites, yet find themselves drawn to each other through the ruffian crimes around them. They try to hide their relations to superheroes, but when Jon can lift pretty much anything, people tend to grow suspicious, you know? Overall, a relatively quick and pleasant read. Only really recommend for younger readers or those who aren't too connected to the DC universe.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Rachel

    I picked this up because my almost seven year-old son is VERY into graphic novels. I'm always looking for something new that we can read together, books that fall into this middle-grade range. Super Sons seemed like a perfect fit. And it was. For him. HE LOVED IT. I think he said, "This is a best book ever!" For him, it would have been hands down a 5-star read. For me it barely ekes out 3. Batman and Superman's teenage sons team up with some girls we barely know to find the cause of a disease tha I picked this up because my almost seven year-old son is VERY into graphic novels. I'm always looking for something new that we can read together, books that fall into this middle-grade range. Super Sons seemed like a perfect fit. And it was. For him. HE LOVED IT. I think he said, "This is a best book ever!" For him, it would have been hands down a 5-star read. For me it barely ekes out 3. Batman and Superman's teenage sons team up with some girls we barely know to find the cause of a disease that had no connection to the overall plot and seemed to pop out of nowhere. This had bigger plot holes than the newly discovered black hole. I have no idea why Batman isn't the picture, or how these kids ended up chasing after the same bad guys. Apparently everyone is falling ill to this strange disease, but we don't hear about it until after Lois Lane becomes ill. Also, if there's some incurable sickness floating around school, wouldn't the kids/teachers/parents be a little concerned? Then there's Candace. Her mother's dying prophesy was that Candace would be the leader of the five fingers. (Don't ask me. I have no idea what this is.) So when Candace finally meets the other four fingers, she calls them liars and runs away from them? This could have benefited greatly from some backstory and streamlining. What I thought was going to be a story about saving Earth in the face of extreme global warming turned into convenient disease that doesn't really harm anyone except Lois Lane.

  7. 5 out of 5

    John

    I read an ARC of this and, so far, at least, there's more wrong with this book than there is right. Some of the issues will probably be fixed by publication time; others won't. The art is generally flat and muddy-looking; I suspect that there is some part of the production process which hasn't been done yet to resolve this. There's also a typo in the foreword (the author refers to "Columbria," but throughout the book it's spelled "Coleumbria"). Issues which will probably *not* be fixed by the time I read an ARC of this and, so far, at least, there's more wrong with this book than there is right. Some of the issues will probably be fixed by publication time; others won't. The art is generally flat and muddy-looking; I suspect that there is some part of the production process which hasn't been done yet to resolve this. There's also a typo in the foreword (the author refers to "Columbria," but throughout the book it's spelled "Coleumbria"). Issues which will probably *not* be fixed by the time the book is published: * Bruce Wayne's son is a tiresome entitled twerp, and it's not at all clear that the author knows that. * We don't spend enough time with any of the rest of the characters before the plot kicks off, which means that it's hard to care about them or what happens to them. * The entire book reads like it was written and drawn by people who don't read comics. In particular, it has a clumsy visual grammar which sometimes makes it hard to tell what is happening in a scene. As an example, I had to read the three panels where Jon rips off a button and crushes it six times before I understood that he was probably taking something off the other person's clothes and crushing it, a guess which wasn't even confirmed until a bit of dialogue on the next page. This scene could have been handled much more cleanly with a different choice of images, angles, and distances from the "camera"--I have ideas on how to do that, but it's not my job to rewrite the clumsy bits. * The book also makes liberal use of thought balloons (well--here they're boxes), which were falling out of favor back in the late 80s, mostly because the technique is lazy and the effect is cheesy. In this case, the thought balloons also lead to a lot of head-hopping, which feels both disorganized and omniscient and also makes some of the authorial choices feel like cheating (for example, choosing to end the scene where Jon demands someone's name right after he asks the question and before he gets the answer). At least it was a quick read.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Rian *fire and books*

    Lacked transitions and wasn’t easy to follow because of that. The outside story is good. There are issues stemming from global warming resulting in coastal dwelling families being forced to move inward, causing issues with the land locked cities. There’s chaos, sabotage, magic, and missing parents too. But overall? The lack of transitions and sudden appearance of a plot line felt really disjointed. I’ll probably read book 2, but it’s certainly not one I’ll recommend to my customers.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Chad

    I thought this book was boring. I literally started nodding off while reading it. The art was terrible, but did its job. I hope that DC addresses some of the contrast issues with the coloring. Some panels were difficult to read visually, as the colors would almost blend together, particularly in dark scenes. The characterizations were just bad, and really offered nothing interesting about the characters, not to mention that they had really ugly costumes. Jon Kent complains about his parents runn I thought this book was boring. I literally started nodding off while reading it. The art was terrible, but did its job. I hope that DC addresses some of the contrast issues with the coloring. Some panels were difficult to read visually, as the colors would almost blend together, particularly in dark scenes. The characterizations were just bad, and really offered nothing interesting about the characters, not to mention that they had really ugly costumes. Jon Kent complains about his parents running off to help people, and Damien (or “Ian” as he goes by in this book) is an arrogant jerk with absolutely no redeeming qualities. Both of these characters are different from their DC comic book counterparts, and they lack the depth needed for the audience to get behind them. Also, there are two original(?) characters in this story, but they are so underdeveloped and poorly written that they really shouldn’t have been included. Other issues I had, though they are small, are: One, why did they change Damien’s name to “Ian”? In the story, he hates the name “Damien”, but it’s never explained why, and two: What happened to Alfred? Did he die, or is he on vacation? If you want my advice, skip this book and go for the Super Sons comic book by Peter J. Tomasi. It is way better, and the artwork by Jorge Jimenez is top level stuff, plus the action is also way more entertaining.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Beth Bryden-miller

    I'm not sure if this reads too young for the middle school student, on the fence about how old the kids look. Completely a graphic novel. The storyline introduces a great new character Candance and then drops her storyline to focus on Jon Kent and Damian Wayne. It even introduces a fourth character who was pretty unnecessary. More focus on Candance! As a fan, I didn't like the way that Damian Wayne was called Ian, or his homemade costume. He's also white, like whiter than Superboy, when it would h I'm not sure if this reads too young for the middle school student, on the fence about how old the kids look. Completely a graphic novel. The storyline introduces a great new character Candance and then drops her storyline to focus on Jon Kent and Damian Wayne. It even introduces a fourth character who was pretty unnecessary. More focus on Candance! As a fan, I didn't like the way that Damian Wayne was called Ian, or his homemade costume. He's also white, like whiter than Superboy, when it would have been a good way to introduce another character of color. Here's a good link: https://butwhythopodcast.com/2018/08/...

  11. 5 out of 5

    Heidi

    Jonathan Kent wants to be like his father, Clark Kent, aka Superman, and he is, more than anyone other than his parents, knows. Ian Wayne is already a lot like his father, except with too much arrogance and a lack of experience. But their world is in serious trouble with flooding and other devastating events occurring more and more frequently. In an effort to help, Superman leaves Earth on a mission to Mars, and Bruce Wayne heads for Asia. This leaves the two boys to their own devices, especial Jonathan Kent wants to be like his father, Clark Kent, aka Superman, and he is, more than anyone other than his parents, knows. Ian Wayne is already a lot like his father, except with too much arrogance and a lack of experience. But their world is in serious trouble with flooding and other devastating events occurring more and more frequently. In an effort to help, Superman leaves Earth on a mission to Mars, and Bruce Wayne heads for Asia. This leaves the two boys to their own devices, especially when Jonathan's mother is struck down by a mysterious malady. The two combine forces with two girls, Tilly and Candace (who appears to have powers of her own), to track down the source of the malady, and stop it's spread. This graphic novel is full of excitement and adventure as these budding heroes seek to save the world. Like many graphic novels the focus is on plot and not on character development, but middle grade readers aren't likely to care overly much. The art works well for the graphic novel format and the coloring is nice. The book does end on a major cliffhanger, but there is a bit of an ending. Young readers will most likely be eagerly awaiting the sequel as am I. This is the sort of book that is intended solely for entertainment though so don't go into it expecting a whole lot of depth.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Veronica

    ARC via Netgalley/the ARC shelf at work. Brace yourselves, I have opinions here. Look, I loved Tomasi's Super Sons, ok? And this new series is spitting on everything that made Super Sons great. Damian "Ian" Wayne (whose hatred of his given name is never explained, nor why on earth he would have been given such a white bread nickname in the first place) is a jerk -- which, yes, he's a jerk in every continuity, but he doesn't have Damian's redeeming qualities. We don't get to see his love of anima ARC via Netgalley/the ARC shelf at work. Brace yourselves, I have opinions here. Look, I loved Tomasi's Super Sons, ok? And this new series is spitting on everything that made Super Sons great. Damian "Ian" Wayne (whose hatred of his given name is never explained, nor why on earth he would have been given such a white bread nickname in the first place) is a jerk -- which, yes, he's a jerk in every continuity, but he doesn't have Damian's redeeming qualities. We don't get to see his love of animals, or his desire to please his father, or his conflicted relationship with his mother, or anything at all with his siblings. He's a disrespectful asshole to Patience, who has replaced Alfred (is Alfred dead in this continuity?) and is just overall really unappealing. Other people have already written about the initial whitewashing of his character design, and while his skin tone is darker than was shown in previews, that's literally all that was done to fix the problem. Jon Kent is introduced in a scene where he's *complaining about his parents helping people*, and if there's a bigger misunderstanding of his character in all of the DC Universe, I'd like to know what it is. Then there are two new female characters who get almost zero introduction and they're fighting over Jon's attention because why would you have TWO girls in a story if not so they can fight over a boy. The actual plot is a mess. I'm all in favor of raising awareness of climate change but this book is terrible. The art is the one redeeming quality -- as mentioned above, I'm not crazy about Damian's character design but overall there's a coherent sort of cartoony style that works for this age group.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Jordanne

    Super Sons – Ideal for New, Young Readers 🌟 🌟 🌟 🌟 This book is evidently not aimed at me or my peers, however, I still managed to enjoy the fun, face-paced storytelling and my previous experience with the Super Sons filled in a lot of information gaps that a younger reader is unlikely to notice, but as a more mature reader added another level of humour. I will say for older readers (13+?) that this book will hold very little in terms of an in-depth intro to Super Sons because it is very surface l Super Sons – Ideal for New, Young Readers 🌟 🌟 🌟 🌟 This book is evidently not aimed at me or my peers, however, I still managed to enjoy the fun, face-paced storytelling and my previous experience with the Super Sons filled in a lot of information gaps that a younger reader is unlikely to notice, but as a more mature reader added another level of humour. I will say for older readers (13+?) that this book will hold very little in terms of an in-depth intro to Super Sons because it is very surface level, as per its target audience’s attention span. The animated and colourful artwork is really appealing to a younger audience and I liked it for the tone of the story. My only criticism would be that not much time is spent introducing Candace. I think she has great potential to be a fan favourite among young readers, however, I know I had not heard of her and I’ll tentatively assume she is a brand-new character and I think that can sometimes be a problem in attracting younger readers. This is purely because the cavernous DCU is a bit much to take in at once so iconic, well-known characters that have permeated popular culture en masse (like Batman & Superman) are a great gateway for young people because they already kind of know what they’re about, and by extension can make assumptions about their sons. This pre-existing knowledge isn’t there with Candace so a little more story on her background is probably a good idea to maintain interest. Overall, I really like it and think I will buy a copy for my baby brother once he can be trusted not to rip paper pages. I received a copy of this book from DC Zoom via Edelweiss in exchange for an honest review. To read more of my reviews, visit my blog, Bloodthirsty Little Beasts.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Rachel Reid

    I don’t know who this book is for. If the reader, like the author, is supposed to be completely unfamiliar with the characters and the DCU, then this book did a terrible job of introducing any of the characters or locations. If you were supposed to be a fan of Damian (Ian?!) and Jonathan already, then this would just be baffling because it didn’t capture the characters in the comics at all. The plot was confusing. The art was hard to follow. It was boring. My question is, why do this? Why not writ I don’t know who this book is for. If the reader, like the author, is supposed to be completely unfamiliar with the characters and the DCU, then this book did a terrible job of introducing any of the characters or locations. If you were supposed to be a fan of Damian (Ian?!) and Jonathan already, then this would just be baffling because it didn’t capture the characters in the comics at all. The plot was confusing. The art was hard to follow. It was boring. My question is, why do this? Why not write a stand-alone graphic novel for middle readers that offers a fun, easy-to-read intro to the actual comic book characters? Then they could move on to the many collected volumes of Tomasi’s Super Sons comics. This reads like what it is: someone who has no knowledge of, or respect for, comics, trying to improve on them. And failing.

  15. 4 out of 5

    K Whatsherface

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. After reading: I read this in one sitting....because if I didn't I wouldnt have finished it. I wanted to give up on it halfway. I like the art style itself but I still hate damian's design. and his first costume....ugh....the 2nd costume is also bad but bad in the way I though it should have been the first costume not the batman upgrade. also batkid?! I could see it has a joke. but that's what Jon continued to call him. I get that Candace and Tilly are original to the story. I still dont know if After reading: I read this in one sitting....because if I didn't I wouldnt have finished it. I wanted to give up on it halfway. I like the art style itself but I still hate damian's design. and his first costume....ugh....the 2nd costume is also bad but bad in the way I though it should have been the first costume not the batman upgrade. also batkid?! I could see it has a joke. but that's what Jon continued to call him. I get that Candace and Tilly are original to the story. I still dont know if they are tied to other characters. who knows. This is not the main universe. probably should have said that sooner but I wanted to say something nice and I do like the art....just not the designs. okay jon is fine. he looks like himself. he even seems like himself. Alfred is dead. Yes we couldn't talk about Damian's mom but we could squeeze in time to point out alfred isnt around anymore. Its implied that Damian never really knew him. oh and if you havent figured it out yet, I'm refusing to call Damian, Ian. There is nothing wrong with the name Ian. if your name is Ian I'm sure your a lovely person but Damian is Damian. His dog is name is Titus not Taco.....Yes his dog in this is named Taco.......that's a name I would call a dog but not Damian. Damian isnt really a kid. okay maybe I could see him naming his dog Taco after he started hanging out with Jon because Jon brought out the kid in him. That's part of what made the 2017 super sons so good. can we just get that back please. And yes. Damian did name batcow. but that;s funny. even he can make dumb jokes. Yes. I may be overly thinking this book for kids. I get this is to introduced kids to these characters. Just get them the 2017 series. Also retelling aren't a bad thing. you just dont want to be the catwoman movie when you do it. you want to be the woman woman movie. Before reading: Why does Damian not look like damian? And why is a kid that named his dog Titus going by Ian now? And what's with that logo? And who's the girl? Is she vixen's daughter? Only saying vixen because of the elephant on her shirt. Does vixen have a daughter right now? I Honestly dont know if she ever did in the comics. It's so hard to keep track of who has kids in comics. Because comics. Sometimes they have a son, sometimes they have a daughter, sometimes they have neither because timeless are confusing. I'm going to have to read this now aren't I?

  16. 4 out of 5

    Vic

    SPOILER FREE REVIEW I would rate 3.5 if I could figure out how (I'm new to this site). It's got a nice concept and decent character designs. However, the dialogue and pacing is pretty jarring at some points. Though it's started out kind of rough with this book, I will definitively pick up the next book when it comes out to see if it gets better or worse (at this point I can see it going either way). Overall I recommend it if you have the opportunity to read it early or purchase it when it release SPOILER FREE REVIEW I would rate 3.5 if I could figure out how (I'm new to this site). It's got a nice concept and decent character designs. However, the dialogue and pacing is pretty jarring at some points. Though it's started out kind of rough with this book, I will definitively pick up the next book when it comes out to see if it gets better or worse (at this point I can see it going either way). Overall I recommend it if you have the opportunity to read it early or purchase it when it releases.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Elizabeth Gold

    I wasn't a fan of how story was done, it had it's moments that were entertaining, but all together wasn't my favorite thing that DC has published. (And also why? I'm sorry but if you're going to use iconic characters like Damian oh I mean 'Ian' Wayne and Jon Kent you better live up to the standers of how they were originally created. I can handle a little of the whitewashing of Damian but not to the point of where the one with Arabic genes looks very similar to (me) with Irish genes.)

  18. 5 out of 5

    Ms. Yingling

    E ARC from Netgalley In a slightly distant future, the sons of Superman and Batman are dealing with a world that has a lot of problems. The polar ice caps are melting, and the cities along the coasts are flooding and uninhabitable, despite the efforst of the Wayne Corporation to install flood walls. There is a plan to install a shield of dust over the ice caps, and Superman is recruited, so must spend time away from his family. Jon Kent and his mother relocate inland (as does the Daily Planet), w E ARC from Netgalley In a slightly distant future, the sons of Superman and Batman are dealing with a world that has a lot of problems. The polar ice caps are melting, and the cities along the coasts are flooding and uninhabitable, despite the efforst of the Wayne Corporation to install flood walls. There is a plan to install a shield of dust over the ice caps, and Superman is recruited, so must spend time away from his family. Jon Kent and his mother relocate inland (as does the Daily Planet), where Jon is given a hard time by local kids who don't want to see "flood runners" in their neighborhood. Damian (call him IAN, please!) Wayne is struggling with the fact that his own father has to go to China to try to work out bugs in the flood walls. When Jon's mother becomes sick with a mysterious malady, the two boys team up with Tilly and Candace (who has some mythical ancestry/powers) to try to solve it. The ice cap issue is being repaired, but there are plenty of evil forces at work for the group to fight. This is the first book in a proposed series, and ends in a cliff hanger. Strengths: It's hard to get the format for middle grade graphic novels right, but this does. The amount of text on the page is perfect, and the font a bit larger than other graphic novels, which helps with the reluctant readers who frequently pick these up. The science/environmental tie in is a good one, and it's nice to see Batman and Superman off fighting climate change. Of course, this leaves their sons to save the rest of the world in good, unsupervised tween fashion. Weaknesses: The graphic novel format does not lend itself to deeply developed characters or plot. I love Pearson's writing and was hoping for a good new adventure book, so I was a bit disappointed. While I had no idea that Jon and Damian were established characters, they apparently appear in comic books, and Damian is of Arabic/Asian descent.(https://butwhythopodcast.com/2018/08/...) Clearly, this is problematic in the greater scheme of things if you know the story already. I would have been completely clueless if I hadn't read Goodreads reviews. I just didn't understand why he was so nasty. The son of Batman is evil? Not getting that. What I really think: If Follett does a prebind of this, I will purchase it, but I was clearly not the target demographic. This left me with way more questions than it answered.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Kaitlyn Francis

    this was amazing review to come

  20. 4 out of 5

    Billie

    I loved the art but felt that the story didn't really have any resolution. Even knowing that this is the start of a series, I expected that there would be at least some sense of an ending, but the lack of any real conclusion made this feel more like an opening chapter than an opening volume.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Pop Bop

    The high interest/low reading level approach, (I am assuming this was on purpose), didn't work very well with the haphazard and random plot. Bland and blocky illustration didn't help.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Matthew Galloway

    I can certainly appreciate a new take one characters and this was a cute enough story. However, I felt like the transitions between scenes were odd. They seemed to often stop in the middle of an action that apparently didn't resolve during the fade-out. This led to a rather choppy and confusing feel. I also found it a little odd that though there are four characters, only three are shown on the cover or mentioned in the back copy. Why does the other girl not count when she's obviously doing a lo I can certainly appreciate a new take one characters and this was a cute enough story. However, I felt like the transitions between scenes were odd. They seemed to often stop in the middle of an action that apparently didn't resolve during the fade-out. This led to a rather choppy and confusing feel. I also found it a little odd that though there are four characters, only three are shown on the cover or mentioned in the back copy. Why does the other girl not count when she's obviously doing a lot for the team? Also, how did they become friends anyway? It seemed rather abrupt.

  23. 5 out of 5

    Stephanie

    This was for a younger audience than I anticipated. There's a foreword from the author admitting that he isn't familiar with the current DC canon, which really shows in this work. The story seemed kind of messy, introducing plot threads and new characters but not fully committing to any of them. This might just be because it's for upper elementary kids (I think?) but I didn't care for it as an adult reader. On the upside, they did update the art so that Damian isn't quite so white, which is nice This was for a younger audience than I anticipated. There's a foreword from the author admitting that he isn't familiar with the current DC canon, which really shows in this work. The story seemed kind of messy, introducing plot threads and new characters but not fully committing to any of them. This might just be because it's for upper elementary kids (I think?) but I didn't care for it as an adult reader. On the upside, they did update the art so that Damian isn't quite so white, which is nice.

  24. 4 out of 5

    Josh Newhouse

    A decent start although a little confusing at times... let’s see where this goes in the capable teams’ hands.

  25. 4 out of 5

    tony dillard jr

    If you are familiar with DC’s regular series Super Sons, you know that it is the adventures of the son of Superman, Jon Kent and Batman’s heir, Damian Wayne.And that’s exactly where you readers of the regular series turned occasional miniseries should stop. That’s because this version of the Super Sons takes place on an alternate earth. Science says that the damage to the polar ice caps will be irreparable sometime in the next 10-25 years. However, in Super Sons, the damage is beyond fixing. Well If you are familiar with DC’s regular series Super Sons, you know that it is the adventures of the son of Superman, Jon Kent and Batman’s heir, Damian Wayne.And that’s exactly where you readers of the regular series turned occasional miniseries should stop. That’s because this version of the Super Sons takes place on an alternate earth. Science says that the damage to the polar ice caps will be irreparable sometime in the next 10-25 years. However, in Super Sons, the damage is beyond fixing. Well, almost. Superman has agreed to go into outer space to collect a substance that might help reduce the effects of damaging greenhouse gases. Meanwhile, Bruce Wayne’s Wayne Industries has developed a retractable flood wall in which to protect coastal cities from the rising tides. But as the water’s continue to rise, communities such as Metropolis are abandoned and the people of Coleumbria are forced to move further inland. Already, I think you can see some changes between the DC Comics Super Sons and the DC Zoom imprint. But before we dig further into that, let’s finish with the plot summary. Both the Waynes and Kents are forced to move to the city of Wyndemere. Bruce Wayne has been called away to solve a crisis in Asia. That leaves young Damian in charge of the company. With Lois on assignment covering the floods, Jon is offered an after-school internship at the Wyndemere branch of the Daily Planet. In the absence of their fathers, Jon and Damien witness a sort of lawlessness sweeping their new hometown. Flood refugees experience prejudice at the hands of native Wyndemere residents. A mysterious virus is causing thousands to go into coma with no possible hope of recovery, including Lois Lane. And a strange band of girls are after a newcomer named Candace, who possesses a powerful totem. The only way to get to the bottom of this chaos is for the two young men to join forces! The Polarshield Project is an interesting ‘buddy cop’ sort of comedy. As straight-laced and idealistic Jon joins forces with a half-cocked and wild Damien, you really feel that you are experiencing the early days of Lethal Weapon’s Riggs and Murtaugh as opposed to the first pairings of a Superboy and a Robin. While the story was quite good, the established tropes of young Wayne and Kent isn’t canon. Usually Damian Wayne is very demure. He’s got too much of his grandfather, Ra’s al Ghul, in him to the point that having fun is a four-letter word. Yet here, with Bruce Wayne not wanting his son to be his sidekick, there’s a sort of wackiness to Damien as he tries to become a superhero. Usually in Super Sons, it’s the fish out of water Jon Kent who is the comic relief. Instead, in this series, Kent is the voice of reason. It’s Damien who’s doing odd stuff for an unintended laugh. I guess it’s hard to make an all-ages graphic novel based around a character who is prophesied to be the antiChrist. (Read Detective Comics #666 for more details on Damian Wayne’s future role in the DC Universe.) But I think that Ridley Pearson (Peter and the Starcatchers) might have made the right move by staying away from that area of the Batman Family. But did he have to make Damian Wayne a complete loon? I do agree that setting the Super Sons in an alternate earth was a good decision. It helps staunch readers be able to separate the DC Zoom universe from the comic books. When I saw the description of how this series was going to deal with global warming, an issue which really hasn’t spiral out of control yet in the comics, I envisioned loyal DC readers going into a revolt. But having the characters be so dynamically different is a little off-putting. There are some great new characters in Super Sons and with their introduction, it looks like this series is going to become a Justice League Juniors sort of title. Cassandra is obviously a descendant of the animal master, Vixen. And one of the minor background characters looks ripe to take over the Green Arrow role. But who is this new character named Tilly? A blonde-haired pixie with amazing skills on a computer; is she supposed to be a younger version of Felicity Smoak on TheCW’s Arrow? Hopefully, these questions as well as a slew of other mysteries will be uncovered in book 2, The Foxglove Mission, due out this November. Pearson establishes new DC realm that has promise. He just needs to tighten up on the character development. The art by newcomer Ile Gonzalez is something too that has potential but needs a little bit of work. I love her designs of Jon Kent. But something doesn’t look right with Damian’s eyes. Kids should love this new take on the progeny of The Man of Steel and the Dark Knight. Parents are going to be a little perplexed as this isn’t their Super Sons. It’s a good thing that there is a ‘Who’s Who?’ at the end of this volume that helps clear up any confusion. Besides, this is a book meant for readers aged 8-12. If it doesn’t capture the imagination of the adults, that’s a-okay. This is a Super Sons for the next generation of DC fans!

  26. 5 out of 5

    Jonathan

    I won this book in a First Reads Giveaway. A note for fans of the Super Sons comics: These are not the main continuity versions of the Super Sons. Before the beginning of the book, the main characters were not Robin and Superboy, and their pasts seem to be quite different from their pasts in the comics. "The Polarshield Project" depicts the first time that they meet. The only thing to know about them is that Jon Kent is the son of Lois Lane and Superman, and that Damian ("Ian") is the son of Bru I won this book in a First Reads Giveaway. A note for fans of the Super Sons comics: These are not the main continuity versions of the Super Sons. Before the beginning of the book, the main characters were not Robin and Superboy, and their pasts seem to be quite different from their pasts in the comics. "The Polarshield Project" depicts the first time that they meet. The only thing to know about them is that Jon Kent is the son of Lois Lane and Superman, and that Damian ("Ian") is the son of Bruce Wayne. In this story, which takes place in the country of Coleumbria, flood waters have been rising, causing cities like Gotham and Metropolis to be evacuated. Superman, Batman, and Lois Lane are quickly removed from the plot for various reasons, causing Jon and Ian to team up with a couple of new characters to stop the problem of a spreading infection without the aid of their parents. Readers should note that, although this book takes place in a different continuity, it is not a stand-alone book. It has unresolved plot points, setting up at least one sequel ("The Foxglove Mission"). The remainder of this review will be split into lists of bad things and good things about the book. The Bad 1) Pacing: The primary thing that detracts from the story is that it is occasionally poorly paced. Without any set-up, characters will state things as fact, as if the readers should already know these things. At lease once, a conflict is unrealistically resolved in the course of a few lines. 2) The art can occasionally be unclear. There are at least two call-backs to previous scenes in the book, where the things that are being called back were out of focus in the original scenes. Even if the reader goes back to the first scenes afterwards, they will still be unable recognize the person or thing that the later scene emphasizes. 3) The spoilers: At the end of the book is a character list with descriptions of the characters. The descriptions include spoiler-y plot points which were not mentioned in this first book. 4) The mystery: In contrast to the above, this book focuses too much on setting up later books. The very first scene (which is 8 pages long) sets up a plot that is not resolved in this book. More focus should have been on this book's plot, which could have helped resolve the pacing issue. 5) Puns: A few characters' names are corny puns. 6) The title: This book should not have been called "Super Sons". While Jon and Ian are main characters, they also team up with two new characters, (view spoiler)[ Candace and Tilly (hide spoiler)] . These characters are also main characters of the book, and should be included in the title. The Good 1) Characterization: The author, Ridley Pearson makes sure that the main characters' unique personalities are very clearly defined. The artist, Ile Gonzalez, also helps with the characters. She is very good at differentiating between Superman and Clark Kent . At first, I thought that Bruce Wayne was too similar to Batman (both grim with no sense of humor), but when I looked back, I realized that her Batman was always moving, while Bruce Wayne was always standing very stiffly. 2) The bright colors: This book is geared toward children, and is colored very brightly, making it easier to see what's happening. Black outlines surround the foreground characters, who are drawn more clearly than the background characters. (As mentioned above, there are a few major things which should have been given more focus, but for the most part, the art is good.) 3) World building: Even though a little too much time is spent setting up later books, this world feels like the characters have been living in it. The world clearly has an interesting history, which I hope later books will describe in more detail. (For instance, at one point, there is a heartbreaking reference to Alfred.) 4) Entertainment value: The plot is very entertaining, and I feel that its target demographic will enjoy it. 5) The dog: The adorable dog Taco steals the very few scenes that he appears.

  27. 4 out of 5

    Rachel Williamson

    Apologies in advance if this review seems a bit disjointed. I had to read the book twice to even get a good enough idea of what was happening in order to write this. TL;DR, I just really had a hard time following all of the random things the plot throws out, and while I thought that the art was okay, and the idea is pretty solid, the execution is way off and very confusing. Can't really recommend this to anybody, and my real rating would probably be a 1.5/5. I got an advance reader's copy, so per Apologies in advance if this review seems a bit disjointed. I had to read the book twice to even get a good enough idea of what was happening in order to write this. TL;DR, I just really had a hard time following all of the random things the plot throws out, and while I thought that the art was okay, and the idea is pretty solid, the execution is way off and very confusing. Can't really recommend this to anybody, and my real rating would probably be a 1.5/5. I got an advance reader's copy, so perhaps some of these criticisms will be dealt with in the final version of the book, but this really didn't work for me. While I didn't mind the art style as much as some others did, the sequencing of events is a bit confusing; sometimes dialogue and thought bubbles are incorrectly placed, and the art doesn't always depict what's actually going on in an effective manner. There were times when I turned the page and was confused because a new scene had started in what I thought was the middle of the previous scene. So many scenes felt unfinished, I began to wonder if my copy was missing pages. Damain Wayne is going by "Ian" now, which they never get into, but rest assured, he vehemently corrects anyone who tries to call him by his full name. Jon Kent is alright, I suppose, and I feel like the reader learns about him more than any other character, but that isn't saying much. There are two original characters, Tilly, a friend of Jon's, and Candace, who is maybe a magic princess? I'm not 100% sure, because her backstory is disjointed and unfinished. From what I understand, this is supposed to be a middle grade book. I can't for the life of me understand how, because I'm a full grown adult and I had a hard time following the plot. The basics are that global warming melted the polar ice caps, and there's a project to fix this. The main plot, though, seems to be about some sickness going around tied to a restaurant ? And there's some leader of a group of...terrorists? I have no idea. (view spoiler)[The kids get together because..."Ian" just recruits Jon and Tilly as they're looking into the sickness, and Jon just kind of introduces himself to Candace, so she's a part of the crew as well. And they do some "research". And this somehow ties back to a school? And also the restaurant? All of this information just randomly appears in the plot. I kid you not, about halfway into the book, Tilly just says, "Jon. [Your mother] has the same symptoms as the kids in school. The same symptoms that closed that restaurant." There has not been a reference to anyone being sick at school, or any mention of a restaurant prior to this. This revelation of "symptoms" comes right out of the blue. And then they just roll with it and start investigating some virus, expecting the reader to follow when we've only been introduced to the idea of some kind of sickness about a page before. The alleged restaurant where this sickness occurred is not mentioned by name until pg. 72 and is not depicted until pg. 88. Then, there's a revelation about a food company tied to the virus that also just pops out of nowhere, Candace randomly has some chopsticks that are symbolic(?), they put on costumes not to fight crime, but to break into a warehouse, some random henchman mentions a "she" who will be upset with them, and I guess somehow Jon knows her name is Avryc(?) the next day, and then they decide to ambush Ian because apparently he set them up earlier in the book, but that plot thread goes nowhere. This villain Avryc doesn't even show up until 12 pages from the end of the book, and they defeat her in about 4 pages. I'm just...so confused.(view spoiler)[ (hide spoiler)] (hide spoiler)]

  28. 4 out of 5

    Phoenix

    I can't deny that I picked up Supersons: The Polarshield Project purely for the art style - And I'm glad I did, because the art is easily my favourite aspect about this new comic range from DC Comics aimed at middle school readers. Overall, I would give book 1of this new Supersons series a 3.8/5 - the art was engaging enough I found myself lingering on each page, taking extra time to appreciate the fantastic, and often hilarious, expressions Ile masterfully depicts. The story... while certainly i I can't deny that I picked up Supersons: The Polarshield Project purely for the art style - And I'm glad I did, because the art is easily my favourite aspect about this new comic range from DC Comics aimed at middle school readers. Overall, I would give book 1of this new Supersons series a 3.8/5 - the art was engaging enough I found myself lingering on each page, taking extra time to appreciate the fantastic, and often hilarious, expressions Ile masterfully depicts. The story... while certainly intriguing enough that I'll be back for book 2, felt incomplete and, at times, choppy. There were just moments, and sometimes abrupt scene changes that made me feel like I was trying to piece together a jigsaw, and although I had the overall image, some key pieces were missing, and that left me feeling unfulfilled as a reader. Additionally, there were some events that felt like they were of importance, used to highlight a character's motivations, or flaws, only for that character-defining moment to be all but swept under the rug in latter scenes and not mentioned again (Jon and his hesitance to use his powers to hurt people, for instance). It was frustrating, like I was seeing a glimpse of the character they could be, but for that to be sacrificed for a simpler, less complicated version of themselves. I especially hope that Damian's reasoning for wanting to go by "Ian" instead of his given name is explained - his reaction suggests there is more to this desire than simply not liking the name anymore 🤔 In the end, I have hopes that these storytelling flaws are the simple mistakes of an author using a medium he's not used to, and I suppose I'll find out for sure in book 2, because despite all my complaints... As I mentioned above, the art itself was what drew me to pick up a copy of The Polarshield Project, and it's also the reason I'm gonna stick around for more.

  29. 5 out of 5

    Matisse

    So. About cartoons for kids. The reason things like Steven Universe and Gumball have blown up, while recent Power Rangers seasons haven't, is because kids are smart. If you're going to do a cartoon for kids, you need to be kid-friendly in the presentation and dialogue, but bolt it down with a competent storyline and sympathetic characters. It's how things like Into the Spider-Verse can win Oscars while things like The Emoji Movie...not so much. This is one for the smart kids. This Super Sons ser So. About cartoons for kids. The reason things like Steven Universe and Gumball have blown up, while recent Power Rangers seasons haven't, is because kids are smart. If you're going to do a cartoon for kids, you need to be kid-friendly in the presentation and dialogue, but bolt it down with a competent storyline and sympathetic characters. It's how things like Into the Spider-Verse can win Oscars while things like The Emoji Movie...not so much. This is one for the smart kids. This Super Sons series is definitely on the right track. The plot is so LARGE that it could easily be expanded to a full YA title, the artwork is absolutely delicious, the character designs are adorable (Tilly's hair and wardrobe are so cute!), and the book wisely makes Jon our protagonist as the inexperienced hero...BUT there's just so much to this tale that the book feels rushed. Rushed isn't even the right word...it's that Pearson glosses over plot details to focus on characterization. This means that when the main foursome start acting like, well, a main foursome, it feels earned. Unfortunately, it means the plot can feel a bit jumpy. Plot details that should have been set up in act 1 aren't, while character details flourish through the entire narrative. It's an endearing, if bizarre at times, choice. The saving grace is that this isn't a standalone; the main villain is the weakest part of the comic, but because she simply has to be the monster of the week in a (presumably) serialized saga, we can forgive that. Like its heroes, this is a comic that has so much going on, that it feels too big for its middle-grade britches. But it's only volume one. = )

  30. 5 out of 5

    Alex

    nope. i uhh just, hmmm- really didn’t liked it. here is a few things that went through my head while I was reading this: - i think that there were waaay too many subplots jumbled up into one volume. by the end of it i was just left confused and only a few things sticked with me; - i don’t get why they couldn’t let Damian just be the plain old Damian that we knew from the last super sons. his character was having a very good development that in this one, i think it just went down the drain :( - “Ia nope. i uhh just, hmmm- really didn’t liked it. here is a few things that went through my head while I was reading this: - i think that there were waaay too many subplots jumbled up into one volume. by the end of it i was just left confused and only a few things sticked with me; - i don’t get why they couldn’t let Damian just be the plain old Damian that we knew from the last super sons. his character was having a very good development that in this one, i think it just went down the drain :( - “Ian” is an only child so, none of the other robins even exist and apparently Alfred is dead and is replaced by Patience (??) in which by this point i was just having "why are we still here?" playing in the background and accepting all of this; - the kinda forced romance that they make Jon have with Tilly (??); - Jon knows how to be superboy better then “Ian” knows how to be robin (which was super weird to see). ...but hey one good thing is that i at least was interested in the storyline of Candace right? -_-' sure the first thing anyone is gonna argue against all this is “oh but this book isn’t aimed for you, it’s aimed for kids” well, yeah, you can definitely tell that from the humour in the book, but that never stopped me from reading something and enjoying it. and if it really was aimed for them it did a really bad job in presenting the characters, because i'm still confused as to who is who and what is going in the story. really sad though because i really like super sons and i was pumped to know about this new story and just got disappointed.

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